The 12 Craziest Myths About Lice

Where there is one louse, there are likely to be hundreds or thousands more. A lice outbreak can spread very quickly, but there is one thing that spreads even faster, and that is misinformation about lice and lice treatments. Lice myths and misconceptions are everywhere, and they lead many people to try ineffective and sometimes dangerous lice control methods. In this article, we explore some of the most common myths and misconceptions about lice and lice treatments to help prepare you in the event of a lice outbreak. The 7 Most Common Myths About Lice Lice are very small but, in sufficient numbers, they can cause big problems. The real problem, however, is the fact that many people believe common myths about lice and it leads to ineffective treatment and sometimes worsening of the infestation. Protect yourself and your family by learning the truth about the top 7 craziest myths that exist about lice: Lice can jump and fly. Lice are very tiny insects – they are only about the size of a sesame seed. They have six legs and a long, narrow body but no wings. This being the case, lice are incapable of flight and they do not jump either – they move by crawling. This is why the most common form of transmission is through direct head-to-head contact. An itchy scalp means you have lice. Having an itchy scalp is one of the most common symptoms of head lice, but there are other potential causes for this issue. Dry skin and seborrheic dermatitis (also known as dandruff) are two other common causes. Lice like people with long or dirty hair. Many people believe that lice like dirty hair when, in fact, the opposite is true. Getting lice has nothing to do with your personal hygiene and washing your hair will not be enough to get rid of the problem. Lice actually prefer a clean scalp and they have no preference for long or short hair. All they need to survive is blood from the scalp. You can get lice from your pets. In the same way that you are very unlikely to catch a disease from your dog, you cannot get lice from pets either. Lice are species-specific which means that even if your pet does have life, it is a species that cannot survive on a human host. Human lice require human blood in order to survive and dog lice need dog blood to survive. Lice can carry disease and transmit it to people. Head lice do not carry disease. They are related to the much larger body louse which has been known to carry diseases like typhus and trench fever, but head lice are not known to transit any infection. The only potential health problem caused by a lice outbreak would be the risk of a secondary skin infection from scratching. Your children are most likely to get lice at school. Children are most likely to get lice from places or activities where they have…